2010 Ontario Budget: Chapter II: Ontario's Economic Outlook and Fiscal Plan
Section H: Details of Ontario's Finances

This section provides information on the Province’s historical performance, key fiscal indicators, and details on Ontario’s fiscal plan and outlook.

Table 26
Medium-Term Fiscal Plan and Outlook1
($ Billions)
  Interim Plan Outlook
  2009–10 2010–11 2011–12 2012–13
Revenue 96.4 106.9 107.7 112.0
Expense        
Programs 108.8 115.9 112.9 114.3
Interest on Debt2 8.9 10.0 11.1 12.5
Total Expense 117.7 125.9 124.1 126.9
Reserve 0.7 1.0 1.0
Surplus/(Deficit) (21.3) (19.7) (17.3) (15.9)
Net Debt3 193.2 220.0 245.0 267.8
Accumulated Deficit3 134.6 154.3 171.6 187.5
  • 1 Both revenue and expense have been restated to reflect a fiscally neutral accounting change for the revised presentation of education property taxes.
  • 2 Interest on Debt expense is net of interest capitalized during construction of tangible capital assets of $0.1 billion in 2009–10, $0.2 billion in 2010–11, $0.2 billion in 2011–12, and $0.2 billion in 2012–13.
  • 3 Net Debt is calculated as the difference between liabilities and financial assets. The annual change in Net Debt is equal to the surplus/deficit of the Province plus the change in non-financial assets; and the change in the fair value of the Ontario Nuclear Funds. Accumulated Deficit is calculated as the difference between liabilities and total assets. The annual change in the Accumulated Deficit is equal to the surplus/deficit plus the change in the fair value of the Ontario Nuclear Funds.
  • Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.
Table 27
Revenue
($ Millions)
  2007–08 Actual
2008–09
Interim
2009–10
Plan
2010–11
Taxation Revenue        
Personal Income Tax 25,472 25,738 24,049 25,942
Sales Tax1 16,745 17,021 17,410 19,137
Corporations Tax 12,990 6,748 5,381 7,390
Education Property Tax2 5,754 5,696 5,673 5,316
Employer Health Tax 4,605 4,617 4,551 4,701
Ontario Health Premium 2,713 2,776 2,726 2,871
Gasoline Tax 2,360 2,323 2,365 2,366
Land Transfer Tax 1,363 1,013 1,022 1,023
Tobacco Tax 1,127 1,044 1,080 966
Fuel Tax 733 698 646 652
Beer and Wine Tax (replacing Fees)3 414
Electricity Payments-In-Lieu of Taxes 546 830 525 481
Other Taxes 481 352 353 342
  74,889 68,856 65,781 71,601
Government of Canada        
Canada Health Transfer 8,487 8,942 9,737 10,217
Canada Social Transfer 3,778 4,079 4,204 4,327
Equalization 347 972
Infrastructure Programs 207 151 969 2,146
Labour Market Programs 664 797 1,261 1,207
Social Housing 525 520 492 487
Wait Times Reduction Fund 468 235 97 97
Other Federal Payments 2,468 1,867 1,458 4,230
  16,597 16,591 18,565 23,683
Government Business Enterprises        
Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation 1,857 1,921 1,883 1,859
Liquor Control Board of Ontario 1,374 1,410 1,419 1,465
Ontario Power Generation Inc./Hydro One Inc. 1,214 713 797 844
Other Government Enterprises (8) (2) (1) (4)
  4,437 4,042 4,098 4,164
Other Non-Tax Revenue        
Reimbursements 1,464 1,379 1,375 1,095
Vehicle and Driver Registration Fees 1,051 1,034 1,045 1,067
Electricity Debt Retirement Charge 982 970 912 916
Power Sales 929 953 1,436 1,385
Sales and Rentals 553 733 645 673
Other Fees and Licences 677 683 710 749
Beer and Wine Fees (replaced by Tax)3 466 459 458 115
Net Reduction of Power Purchase Contract Liability 398 373 348 339
Royalties 193 205 184 195
Miscellaneous Other Non-Tax Revenue 943 655 852 885
  7,656 7,444 7,965 7,419
Total Revenue 103,579 96,933 96,409 106,867
  • 1 Sales Tax in 2010–11 includes Retail Sales Tax and Harmonized Sales Tax. As announced in the 2009 Budget, effective July 1, 2010, the Retail Sales Tax will be replaced with a value-added tax and combined with the federal Goods and Services Tax to create a federally administered Harmonized Sales Tax.
  • 2 Education Property Tax (EPT) revenue, rather than netting against Education expense, will now be reported as revenue. These presentation changes are fiscally neutral.
  • 3 Beer and Wine Tax replaces reduced Beer and Wine Fees (–$343 million) and the reduced sales tax on alcohol (–$71 million). There is no net new revenue for the Province.
Table 28
Total Expense
($ Millions)
Ministry Expense 2007–08 Actual
2008–09
Interim
2009–10
Plan
2010–11
Aboriginal Affairs1 33 55 69.0 75.5
Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs1 731 877 1,141.4 1,288.1
Attorney General 1,650 1,669 1,605.6 1,709.8
Board of Internal Economy 257 188 195.0 195.0
Children and Youth Services 3,733 4,069 4,455.7 4,667.3
Citizenship and Immigration 90 89 104.3 112.4
Community and Social Services 7,549 8,001 8,673.3 9,263.2
Community Safety and Correctional Services 1,982 2,121 2,257.7 2,690.6
Consumer Services 54 58 54.4 60.0
Economic Development and Trade1 328 245 262.3 349.8
Education1,2 18,733 19,626 20,636.4 21,363.7
Energy and Infrastructure1 389 251 369.5 683.3
Environment1 347 363 362.4 383.0
Executive Offices 36 35 35.6 33.1
Finance1 380 677 555.7 652.0
Francophone Affairs, Office of 5 5 5.1 5.1
Government Services1 916 939 1,230.8 1,102.4
Health and Long-Term Care 37,744 40,352 43,083.1 45,352.4
Health Promotion1 364 382 380.9 408.7
Labour 170 177 183.6 192.2
Municipal Affairs and Housing1 744 756 693.0 686.4
Natural Resources 629 621 624.2 600.1
Northern Development, Mines and Forestry 506 645 637.6 857.3
Research and Innovation1 301 295 343.8 411.5
Revenue1 641 635 1,161.8 1,003.8
Tourism and Culture1 584 566 684.0 715.1
Training, Colleges and Universities1 5,787 6,081 6,663.4 7,147.2
Transportation1 1,892 2,038 2,110.0 2,294.6
Interest on Debt3 8,914 8,566 8,930.0 9,961.2
Other Expense1 7,490 2,960 10,229.3 12,767.0
Year-End Savings4 (1,174.5)
Total Expense 102,979 103,342 117,738.8 125,857.3
  • 1 Details on other ministry expense can be found in Table 29, Other Expense.
  • 2 Education expense now includes School Board Expense, including $20.9 billion in 2010–11 as explained in the Addendum to the 2010 Ontario Budget: Accountability, Transparency and Financial Management.
  • 3 Interest on debt is net of interest capitalized during construction of tangible capital assets of $109 million in 2009–10 and $212 million in 2010–11.
  • 4 As in past years, the Year-End Savings provision reflects anticipated underspending that has historically arisen at year-end due to factors such as program efficiencies, and changes in project startups and implementation plans.
  • Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.
Table 29
Other Expense
($ Millions)
Ministry Expense 2007–08 Actual
2008–09
Interim
2009–10
Plan
2010–11
Aboriginal Affairs        
One-Time Expense for the First Nations Gaming Agreement 201
Agriculture, Food and Rural Affairs        
One-Time Extraordinary Assistance 274
Time-Limited Investments in Infrastructure 842.1 1,898.0
Time-Limited Assistance 76 13 28.5 9.0
Economic Development and Trade        
One-Time Investments 152
Education        
Teachers' Pension Plan1 342 50 255.0 525.0
Energy and Infrastructure        
Capital Contingency Fund 200.0
One-Time Investments in Municipal Infrastructure 450
Environment        
One-Time Investments 68 36.5
Finance        
One-Time Automotive Sector Support2 4,000.0
Investing in Ontario Act Investments 1,149
Ontario Municipal Partnership Fund 907 905 782.9 645.5
Operating Contingency Fund 50.0 1,840.4
Pension Benefit Guarantee Fund 500.0
Power Purchases 929 953 1,436.0 1,385.0
Government Services        
Pension and Other Employee Future Benefits 531 971 917.0 1,102.0
Health Promotion        
Time-Limited Investments in Infrastructure 47.8 345.1
Municipal Affairs and Housing        
Time-Limited Investments in Municipal Social and Affordable Housing Stock 100 585.3 659.3
Research and Innovation        
One-Time Investments 87 5.0
Revenue        
Harmonized Sales Tax Transitional Support 3,200.0
Tourism and Culture        
One-Time Investments 57
Training, Colleges and Universities        
Time-Limited Investments 699 553.5 957.7
Transportation        
One-Time Transit and Infrastructure Investments 1,536 189.7
Total Other Expense 7,490 2,960 10,229.3 12,767.0
  • 1 Numbers reflect PSAB pension expense. Ontario's matching contributions to the plan grow from $808 million in 2007–08 to $1,245 million in 2009–10 and $1,307 million in 2010–11.
  • 2 Reflects the estimated fiscal impact of Ontario's $4.8 billion in support to the automotive industry.
  • Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.
Table 30
2010–11 Infrastructure Expenditures
($ Millions)
Sector Total Infrastructure Expenditures 2009–10 Interim 2010–11 Plan
Investment in Capital Assets Transfers and Other Infrastructure Expenditures1 Total Infrastructure Expenditures
Transportation        
Transit 1,941 1,381 355 1,735
Highway Expansion/High Occupancy Vehicle Lanes 873 1,018 1,018
Highway and Bridge Rehabilitation 922 1,017 1,017
Other Transportation2 773 1,022 117 1,139
Health        
Hospitals 2,306 2,065 10 2,075
Other Health 299 311 143 454
Education–School Boards 1,731 1,657 1,657
Postsecondary        
Colleges 146 146 146
Universities 83 98 98
Water/Environment 505 41 306 348
Municipal and Local Infrastructure 464 34 493 527
Justice 271 641 29 670
Other 760 697 384 1,082
Short-Term Stimulus Investments 1,627 697 3,679 4,376
Subtotal 12,702 10,728 5,614 16,342
Less: Other Partner Funding3 514 464 464
Total Excluding Partner Funding 12,188 10,264 5,614 15,878
Less: Flow-Throughs4 1,120 487 2,179 2,666
Total Provincial Expenditure5 11,068 9,776 3,435 13,212
  • 1 Mainly consists of transfers for capital purposes to municipalities and universities, and expenditures for capital repairs. These expenditures are included in the Province’s total expense in Table 28.
  • 2 Other transportation includes planning activities, property acquisition, highway service centres and other infrastructure programs (e.g., municipal/local roads/remote airports).
  • 3 Third-Party Contributions to capital investment in the consolidated sectors (schools, colleges and hospitals).
  • 4 Mostly federal government transfers for capital investments.
  • 5 Total Provincial Infrastructure Expenditure includes Investment in Capital Assets of $8.5 billion for 2009–10.
  • Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.
Table 31
Ten-Year Review of Selected Financial and Economic Statistics1
($ Millions)
  2001–02 2002–032 2003–04 2004–05 2005–063 2006–07 2007–08 Actual
2008–09
Interim
2009–102
Plan
2010–11
Financial Transactions                    
Revenue 72,307 74,675 74,269 83,861 90,305 96,640 103,579 96,933 96,409 106,867
Expense                    
Programs 61,595 64,864 70,148 76,048 80,988 85,540 94,065 94,776 108,809 115,896
Interest on Debt4 10,337 9,694 9,604 9,368 9,019 8,831 8,914 8,566 8,930 9,961
Total Expense 71,932 74,558 79,752 85,416 90,007 94,371 102,979 103,342 117,739 125,857
Reserve 700
Surplus/(Deficit) 375 117 (5,483) (1,555) 298 2,269 600 (6,409) (21,330) (19,690)
Net Debt5,6 132,121 132,647 138,816 140,921 149,928 150,618 153,188 165,864 193,226 219,991
Accumulated Deficit7 132,121 118,705 124,188 125,743 109,155 106,776 105,617 113,238 134,568 154,258
Gross Domestic Product (GDP) at Market Prices 453,701 477,763 493,081 516,106 537,383 560,286 585,723 587,827 567,199 592,155
Personal Income 361,187 369,420 381,127 400,994 419,457 442,615 464,593 482,086 480,379 496,232
Population — July (000s) 11,897 12,091 12,242 12,391 12,528 12,665 12,795 12,936 13,069 13,194
Net Debt per Capita (dollars) 11,105 10,971 11,339 11,373 11,967 11,892 11,972 12,822 14,785 16,674
Personal Income per Capita (dollars) 30,360 30,553 31,133 32,362 33,482 34,948 36,311 37,267 36,757 37,610
Total Expense as a per cent of GDP 15.9 15.6 16.2 16.6 16.7 16.8 17.6 17.6 20.8 21.3
Interest on Debt as a per cent of Revenue 14.3 13.0 12.9 11.2 10.0 9.1 8.6 8.8 9.3 9.3
Net Debt as a per cent of GDP 29.1 27.8 28.2 27.3 27.9 26.9 26.2 28.2 34.1 37.2
Accumulated Deficit as a per cent of GDP 29.1 24.8 25.2 24.4 20.3 19.1 18.0 19.3 23.7 26.1
  • 1 Both revenue and expense have been restated to reflect a fiscally neutral accounting change for the revised presentation of education property taxes.
  • 2 Starting in 2002–03, investments in major tangible capital assets owned by the Province (land, buildings, and transportation infrastructure) have been capitalized and amortized to expense over their useful lives. Starting in 2009–10, investments in minor tangible capital assets owned by the Province (information technology infrastructure and systems, vehicles and marine fleet and aircraft) will also be capitalized and amortized to expense. All capital assets owned by consolidated organizations are being accounted for in a similar manner.
  • 3 Starting in 2005–06, the Province’s financial reporting was expanded to include hospitals, school boards and colleges. Total expense prior to 2005–06 has not been restated to reflect expanded reporting.
  • 4 Interest On Debt is net of interest capitalized during construction of tangible capital assets of $109 million in 2009–10 and $212 million in 2010–11.
  • 5 Net Debt is calculated as the difference between liabilities and financial assets. The annual change in Net Debt is equal to the surplus/deficit of the Province plus the change in non-financial assets and, effective April 1, 2007, the change in the fair value of the Ontario Nuclear Funds.
  • 6 Starting in 2009–10, Net Debt includes the net debt of hospitals, school boards and colleges consistent with Public Sector Accounting Board standards. For comparative purposes, Net Debt has been restated from 2005–06 to 2008–09 to conform with this revised presentation. Net Debt has also been restated in 2003–04, 2004–05 and 2005–06 to reflect the value of hydro corridor lands transferred to the Province from Hydro One Inc.
  • 7 Accumulated Deficit is calculated as the difference between liabilities and total assets. The annual change in the Accumulated Deficit is equal to the surplus/deficit plus, effective April 1, 2007, the change in the fair value of the Ontario Nuclear Funds. For fiscal 2005–06, the change in the Accumulated Deficit includes the opening combined net assets of hospitals, school boards and colleges that were recognized upon consolidation of these Broader Public Sector entities. For fiscal 2006–07, the change in the Accumulated Deficit includes an adjustment to the unfunded liability of the Ontario Electricity Financial Corporation made at the beginning of the year. For fiscal 2007–08, a $1.2 billion decrease in the Accumulated Deficit is made up of $0.6 billion in the Province’s operating surplus, with the remainder resulting from a change in accounting policy. Under this change, Ontario Nuclear Funds Agreement funds are reported at fair value on Ontario Power Generation Inc. books and, upon consolidation, on the Province’s consolidated financial statements.
  • Sources: Ontario Ministry of Finance and Statistics Canada.
Chart 19: Pie Chart: Composition of Revenue, 2010-11
Chart 20: Pie Chart: Composition of Total Expense, 2010-11
Chart 21: Pie Chart: Composition of Program Expense, 2010-11

Support from Gaming for Health Care, the Ontario Trillium Foundation and Communities

Provincial proceeds from gaming activities continue to support Provincial priorities, including the operation and support of hospitals, charities, amateur sports, communities and the agricultural sector.

Table 32
Support for Health Care, Charities, and Problem Gambling and Related Programs
($ Millions)
  Interim
2009–10
Plan
2010–11
Revenue from Lotteries, Charity Casinos and Slot Machines at Racetracks:    
Operation of Hospitals 1,543 1,567
Ontario Trillium Foundation 120 120
Problem Gambling and Related Programs 40 39
Ontario Amateur Sports 10 10
Revenue from Commercial Casinos:    
General Government Priorities 171 123
Total 1,883 1,859
  • Note: Numbers may not add due to rounding.

Revenue from Lotteries, Charity Casinos and Slot Machines at Racetracks

The Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation Act, 1999, requires that net Provincial revenue generated from lotteries, charity casinos and racetrack slot machines support services such as the operation of hospitals, problem gambling and related programs, amateur sports, and funding for charitable and not-for-profit organizations through the Ontario Trillium Foundation.

An estimated $1,567 million in net revenue from lotteries, charity casinos and slot machines at racetracks will be applied to support the operation of hospitals in 2010–11.

In 2010–11, the Ontario Trillium Foundation will receive $120 million to help build strong and healthy communities through contributions to charitable and not-for-profit organizations in the arts and culture, sports and recreation, human and social services, and environment sectors.

Two per cent of gross slot-machine revenue, estimated at $39 million for 2010–11, is allocated for problem gambling prevention, treatment and research programs.

The Quest for Gold lottery will provide an estimated $10 million in 2010–11 for direct financial support to Ontario’s high-performance amateur athletes.

Benefits from Commercial Casinos

In 2010–11, net Provincial revenue from commercial casinos, estimated at $123 million, will be used to support general government priorities, including health care, education and public infrastructure. In addition to the support for general government priorities, commercial casino operations support approximately 10,800 direct jobs in Ontario and provide vital tourism and economic development attractions for their respective communities.

Other Beneficiaries of Charity Casinos and Slot Machines at Racetracks

Table 33
Support for Agricultural Sector and Municipalities
($ Millions)
  Interim
2009–10
Plan
2010–11
Agricultural Sector1 333 346
Municipalities 76 77
Total 409 423
  • 1The agricultural sector’s share of racetrack slot-machine revenue and municipalities’ share of slot-machine revenue from charity casinos or racetrack slot facilities is received directly from the Ontario Lottery and Gaming Corporation.

Approximately 20 per cent of gross revenue from slot machines at racetracks is used to promote the economic growth of the horse-racing industry. Since 1998, this initiative has provided over $2.9 billion to the horse-racing industry in Ontario, a key component of the Province’s agricultural sector. For 2010–11, additional support is estimated at $346 million.

A portion of gross slot-machine revenue, estimated at $77 million in 2010–11, will be provided to municipalities that host charity casinos and slot operations at racetracks. These revenues will help offset local infrastructure and service costs.